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My Rates

6 Months 3.10%
1 Year 3.49%
2 Years 2.84%
3 Years 3.09%
4 Years 3.24%
5 Years 3.09%
7 Years 3.14%
10 Years 3.69%
6 Months Open 6.10%
1 Year Open 6.25%
*Rates subject to change and OAC
AGENT LICENSE ID
M14000483
BROKERAGE LICENSE ID
10194
Lavinia D'Silva Mortgage Broker

Lavinia D'Silva

Mortgage Broker


Phone:
Address:
9037 Derry Road, Milton, Ontario

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Hello and thank you for spending your valuable time visiting my website.

 

As a Mortgage Professional, it is my top priority to provide you with the best information and advice based on your mortgage and financing needs. My goal is to ensure that you receive the best mortgage available today for your individual mortgage needs

 

As a home owner myself, I understand that purchasing a home is one of life's most exciting endeavours, and is also a very comprehensive one.

 

Whether you are looking to purchase your very first home, refinancing your mortgage to free up some equity or renewing your existing mortgage, we have a variety of products available to meet your needs.

 

I’m dedicated to results!


BLOG / NEWS Updates

Housing Market Digest by Will Dunning, Economist for Mortgage Professionals Canada

The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) now requires that all residential mortgages by federally-regulated lenders must be stress-tested, at two percentage points above the contract interest rate (or the 5- year posted rate, if that is higher). In combination with the requirements for mortgage insurance, about 90% of all new mortgages will be tested. This can be expected to reduce housing activity by 10-15%. It is on top of the impact from recent rises for mortgage interest rates (another 5-10% drop in activity). The combined 15-25% drop in housing activity will affect the broader economy. In two years, employment could be 150,000-250,000 lower than it would otherwise be. There is a risk that house prices will fall. In a modern economy, a sustained drop in house prices is one of the most dangerous things that can happen: as happened in the US a decade ago, falling house prices can turn into widespread economic decline. Resale activity recovered a bit more in September, to 492,900, due to partial rebounds in BC and Ontario. Activity is flat in most other areas. CREAs House Price Index was flat in September. The year-over-year change is now 10.7% (down from the peak of 19.7% that was seen in April). The sales-to-new-listings ratio (SNLR) was 55.7% in September, slightly above the balanced market threshold of 51%. This indicator points to an outlook for stable prices (at worst). But, as noted, OSFIs stress test policy creates a risk of falling prices. We should, in general, expect that resale activity will trend upwards over time, because the population is growing and the housing inventory is expanding. Therefore, it is useful to look at sales on a per capita basis. Recent activity is below the long-term average.

Tips to take charge of your finances and live within your means

(NC) Are you stressed about money? Being in control of your spending is one way of reducing stress in your life. According to Statistics Canada, most of us are burdened with high levels of household debt. Simply put, too many people are spending more than they earn. They are saving less and not saving enough for retirement. At the same time, people are living longer. Living within your means is not always easy, especially when money is tight, but it is the best way to avoid excessive debt. A heavy debt load makes you vulnerable if you lose your job, have unexpected expenses or interest rates go up on your loans. Here is how you can start: Make a budget. Having a budget that lays out sources of income and monthly expenses can help you commit to a spending plan. Know the difference between your wants and needs. Put your needs first; your wants can wait. Choose your credit card wisely. Pay off the balance in full each month so you can build a good credit history and avoid high interest charges. Think ahead to retirement. Canadians are living to an average age of 86. If you retire at 65, that could mean you are living off savings for 21 years or more. Start saving as soon as you can. Find more tips from the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada online at canada.ca/it-pays-to-know. www.newscanada.com

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