Marcel Ghazouli Mortgage Broker

Marcel Ghazouli

Mortgage Broker

210-1179 King St W, Toronto, Ontario









It PAYS to shop around!

Many Canadian homeowners pay too much for their homes because they are not getting the best mortgage financing available in the market.  Lack of relevant  information or fear of the unknown can cause costly mistakes down the road. 

Mortgage lending has changed for the better.  If ever a second opinion was warranted, it is definitely worth your while to call me and find out more.  With so many more borrowing solutions available today, you have more choices and strategies than ever before to attain your future financial goals.  I'm here to help you achieve them.   

The mortgage process can be intimidating for homeowners, and some financial institutions don't make the process any easier.  I’m an independent, unbiased expert with access to over 40 lenders.  This is because I don't work for any one lender, I work for you.  This means that the end result will be customized to fit your immediate financial needs and future goals, and not those of the lender.

As your personal Mortgage advisor, I will be with you through the life of your mortgage.  I save you money by sourcing the best products at the best rates – not only on your first mortgage but through every subsequent renewal. So whether you're buying a home, renewing your mortgage, refinancing, renovating, investing, or consolidating your debts — I’ll help you get the right financing, from the right lender, at the right rate. Let's get started!

BLOG / NEWS Updates

The Teranet-National Bank House Price Index ticked down 0.1% in February

In February the TeranetNational Bank National Composite House Price Index(tm) retreated 0.1% from the previous month, following December and January rises that had interrupted a downtrend. It was the first February decline since 2013. The index was up in only three of the 11 metropolitan markets surveyed, the fewest since October 2014: Vancouver (+0.4%), Hamilton (+0.2%) and Halifax (+0.8%). The index for Victoria was flat on the month and the other seven component indexes were down: Toronto 0.1%, Montreal 0.3%, Ottawa-Gatineau 0.7%, Edmonton 0.8%, Calgary 0.8%, Winnipeg 1.0%, Quebec City 1.5%. For Vancouver it was the 12th rise in 14 months, taking its index to a new record. However, this markets raw (unsmoothed) index* was down 1.3% on the month, a retreat coinciding with a cooling of home sales as reported by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver. The raw index for Toronto declined after three consecutive rises. In previous months observers had noted a certain haste on the part of buyers to beat the entry into effect of tougher conditions for obtaining an uninsured mortgage. The advance of the Hamilton index interrupted a run of five declines. The retreat of the Montreal index was the first in 14 months. This is not a concern, since the Greater Montral Real Estate Board reported the strongest sales in six years for the first two months of a year.

Canadian Income Survey, 2016

Canadian families and unattached individuals had a median after-tax income of $57,000 in 2016. Median after-tax income increased from 2011 to 2014, but held steady in 2015 and 2016. The slower growth in 2015 and 2016 was associated with the resource price slowdown, which began in the second half of 2014. After-tax income is comprised of income from market sources and government transfers. Market income includes employment income, retirement income and income from investments, while government transfers include benefits to seniors, child benefits, Employment Insurance benefits, social assistance and other benefits. While growth in overall median after-tax income slowed in 2015 and 2016, there was also a significant increase in government transfer income. Median income from government transfers rose from $5,800 in 2014 to $7,400 in 2016. About half of this rise was due to increased child benefits, which became a larger source of income for families with children. In 2014, the median child benefit received by couple families with children were $2,500. This rose to $3,400 in 2015, and to $4,000 in 2016. For a lone-parent family, the median benefits rose from $5,100 in 2014 to $5,800 in 2015, and then to $6,400 in 2016.


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